18 percent of the total U.S. natural gas production to come from Marcellus shale in December

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The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimated the Marcellus region is projected to exceed 13 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) this month in the newest Drilling Productivity Report (DPR).

The U.S. Energy Information Administration estimated the Marcellus region is projected to exceed 13 billion cubic feet per day (Bcf/d) this month in the newest Drilling Productivity Report (DPR). The Marcellus shale was only producing around 2 Bcf/d as early as 2010, but now is expected to produce 18 percent of total U.S. natural gas in December.

The Marcellus shale is located in Pennsylvania and West Virginia and is one of the largest U.S. natural gas production regions. Drilling has increased in the area in search for more natural gas production wells. According to Business Insider, there's a good chance oil and gas companies will plan to increase spending on property and land for drilling.

The U.S. natural gas market is quickly evolving as production increases in areas like the Marcellus shale. Exact percentages are difficult since the total natural gas production estimate is set at market production, and the DPR projects gross withdrawals, according to the EIA.

New-well gas production on the rise

The EIA reported that although the amount of drilling rigs surrounding the Marcellus shale has remained low the past few months, new-well gas production has continued to increase. However, the production has been on a steady incline in recent months. According to Business Insider, the Marcellus and Utica shales have drastically increased in the third quarter of 2013, in comparison to the second quarter. The pipeline connections and the beginning of gas-processing plants are a factor in the higher gas production. 

Expansion projects are in place for a natural gas pipeline and are predicted to boost at least 3.5 Bcf/d of takeaway capacity in the Mid-Atlantic markets in 2015, according the the EIA. Northeast regions have seen a cutback in the natural gas flow from the Marcellus shale, but the added projects should raise the manufacturing of new wells and parts. Business Insider reported that energy and natural gas production equipment costs were stable in 2013.

The growth in gas production is also due to the increased output from older shut-in wells or wells that were running at a lower amount because of the restrictions in takeaway capacity within the shale's region. Upgrades to the well's infrastructure within the Marcellus shale increased gas production volumes too.

With the amount of well upgrades and increased gas production, energy explorers can count on Broadwind Energy's custom gears and gearbox designs used in frac pump drives and drilling operations. Broadwind manufactures an assortment of gears, such as klingenberg spiral bevel gears, which help expand the continuous natural gas production in the U.S. 

News Source : 18 percent of the total U.S. natural gas production to come from Marcellus shale in December

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