For American Diabetes Month, Join the American Diabetes Association and Discover the #EverydayReality of Those Affected by Diabetes

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Michelle Kirkwood

703-299-2053

Arlington, Virginia
November 1, 2018

This November, actor Winston Duke and the American Diabetes Association set out to spark a national conversation about diabetes - a disease that impacts nearly half of the U.S. adult population

More than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes and 84 million are at risk, totaling nearly half of the U.S. adult population. The numbers alone are staggering, yet diabetes continues to be misunderstood and often disregarded. 

This November, in recognition of American Diabetes Month™, the American Diabetes Association® (ADA) aims to create urgency about diabetes, help educate others, break down stereotypes, and to correct myths and misunderstandings surrounding the disease. For those who have been diagnosed, diabetes impacts nearly every decision they make daily—from what they'll eat, wear, and do to how they'll take care of themselves and their loved ones. The ADA is looking to share stories about what it truly means to live with diabetes through its new campaign: Everyday Reality.

As part of this year’s campaign, actor Winston Duke, best known for his role as M’Baku in Marvel’s “Black Panther”, has joined the ADA to help spark a national dialogue about diabetes awareness and prevention. Duke has seen the painful mark diabetes can leave on families firsthand and is doing everything in his power to change his family’s future story and the story of millions more. 

Diabetes carries a social burden, as too many Americans wrongfully assume the disease is the result of poor choices,” said Tracey D. Brown, CEO, American Diabetes Association. “We must work to bend the curve and change people’s mindsets about diabetes, which will, in turn, help them change behaviors to better manage the disease and reduce the risk of complicationsharmful effects of diabetes such as damage to the eyes, heart, blood vessels, nervous system, teeth and gums, feet and skin, or kidneys. Studies show that keeping blood glucose, blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels close to normal can help prevent or delay these problems.X and increased diagnosisthe determination of a disease from its signs and symptoms.X. The only choice we have as a nation is to support people with diabetes and help them not only manage it but also thrive with it while we work towards a cure.”

This year’s campaign highlights the personal stories of people impacted by diabetes, which will be shared throughout the month via diabetes.org/everydayreality and via YouTube, , and Instagram:

  • Tracey D. Brown, based in Virginia, ADA’s CEO who was diagnosed with gestational diabetes 14 years ago, and then later with type 2 diabetesa condition characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by either a lack of insulin or the body's inability to use insulin efficiently. Type 2 diabetes develops most often in middle-aged and older adults but can appear in young people.X;
  • Mary Xu, a mother from Washington, D.C. who was diagnosed with gestational diabetes for her first two pregnancies, and now with her third pregnancy is preparing for the same diagnosis;
  • Hunter Sego, a college athlete from DePauw University in Greencastle, IN who was diagnosed with type 1 diabetesa condition characterized by high blood glucose levels caused by a total lack of insulin. Occurs when the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas and destroys them. The pancreas then produces little or no insulin. Type 1 diabetes develops most often in young people but can appear in adults.X at seven years old and is now navigating diabetes while living away from home and his family;
  • Mike and Olivia Nelson, a father, age 40, and a daughter, age 4, from Salt Lake City, UT who both live with type 1 diabetes.

American Diabetes Month posters, social media messages and graphics are available to share with the public at diabetes.org/everydayreality.

While the everyday reality of diabetes can seem overwhelming, there are things everyone can do to improve the lives for people with diabetes and those at risk. Everyone can encourage people to know their risk by taking the ADA’s Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test, become an advocate, magnify the voices of all those living with diabetes and support the organization’s mission by donating today. Join the conversation, share and engage with stories on social media as the ADA highlights the personal accounts and #EverydayReality of those living with this chronicdescribes something that is long-lasting. Opposite of acute.X disease.

The ADA is pleased to welcome two national sponsors for American Diabetes Month: National Oral Care Strategic Partner Colgate Total® and CVS Pharmacy®.

“We’re proud to be partnering with the ADA for the tenth consecutive year,” said Bill Van de Graaf, Vice President and General Manager for Oral Care North America at Colgate. “Through our partnership, we hope to help raise awareness about the link between diabetes and oral health during American Diabetes Month. The everyday reality is that people with diabetes are twice as likely to develop gum disease. Colgate Total® is the only toothpaste approved by the FDA’s NDA process¹ and American Dental Association-accepted to help prevent gingivitisa condition of the gums characterized by inflammation and bleeding.X, the most common form of gum disease. It’s an easy choice people can make to improve the reality of life every day.”

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About the American Diabetes Association

Approximately every 21 seconds, someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. Nearly half of the American adult population has diabetes or prediabetes, and more than 30 million adults and children are living with the disease. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is the nation’s leading voluntary health organization on a mission to prevent and cure diabetes, as well as improve the lives of all people affected by the disease. For nearly 80 years, the ADA has driven discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, while working relentlessly for a cure. Magnifying the urgency of this epidemic, the ADA works to safeguard policies and programs that protect people with the illness, those at risk of developing diabetes and the health care professionals who serve them by initiating programs, advocacy and education efforts that can lead to improved health outcomes and quality of life. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383) or visit us at diabetes.org. Information is available in English and Spanish. Join the conversation with us on , and Instagram (@AmDiabetesAssn).

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