Can Iraq Save Itself?

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Ned Parker interviewed by

As prime minister, Haider al-Abadi could lead Iraq in a positive direction, but long-term stability in the war-torn country will require political concessions from all factions, explains expert Ned Parker.

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What MH17 Means for Russia

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The focus of the EU and U.S. response should go beyond the passenger jet downing and address broader concerns about Russia's policies toward Ukraine, says CFR's Stephen Sestanovich.

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Can Iran’s Nuclear Capacity Be Limited?

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Will the extension of Iran's nuclear talks lead to a deal? Expert Robert Litwak says it depends on whether the Iranian regime is prepared to bear the political costs of concessions on uranium enrichment.

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Karen E. Donfried interviewed by

U.S.-Germany relations have plunged to new lows, but the alliance is far greater than the recent controversy over espionage, says expert Karen Donfried.

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Steven Erlanger interviewed by

Britain finds itself at an unusual crossroads this summer as it negotiates a fraught relationship with Europe and prepares for a possible Scottish secession, says journalist Steven Erlanger.

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Kimberly M. Marten interviewed by

While many in the West perceive Vladimir Putin as an unrestrained strongman, expert Kimberly Marten says that the Russian president is deftly managing disparate factions surrounding the Kremlin.

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Iran Nuclear Deal in Sight?

Suzanne Maloney interviewed by

The prospects for a comprehensive nuclear deal with Iran before a looming deadline look promising, but the United States and its negotiating partners still must clear major obstacles, says expert Suzanne Maloney.

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A U.S. Playbook For Iraq and Syria

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The United States should partner with Iran and Russia in countering Sunni jihadists, the top strategic threat in both Iraq and Syria at the moment, says CFR President Emeritus Leslie H. Gelb.

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Is Iraq Headed for Civil War?

Many Iraqis fear their country is sliding toward a wider sectarian war, pitting the Shiite majority against Sunni forces led by jihadi fighters, says expert Jane Arraf.

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CFR's Daniel Markey sheds light on the two Taliban branches—the Afghan-based group that negotiated the release of a U.S. prisoner of war, and the Pakistani Taliban, which attacked the Karachi airport last weekend.

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How Iran Gains From Assad Victory

Michael Young interviewed by

Syria's presidential elections help the Assad regime consolidate power and boost the regional influence of Iran and Hezbollah, says expert Michael Young.

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Obama’s Unclear Foreign Policy Path

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President Obama's foreign policy speech, following his announced drawdown of U.S. forces in Afghanistan, lacked a clear strategic rationale, says CFR President Richard N. Haass.

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The Coming Struggle Over Iran Nuclear Pact

George Perkovich interviewed by

Nuclear diplomacy between Iran and a group of major powers may miss a significant deadline in July, but both sides appear intent to continue, says expert George Perkovich.

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Ukraine Poised for Uncertain Election

John E. Herbst interviewed by

Ukraine's May 25 elections will likely proceed amid attempted disruptions by separatists in the east and U.S. officials should be prepared to bolster support for the government, says former ambassador John E. Herbst.

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The Pitfalls of Israeli-Palestinian Peace Talks

Aaron David Miller interviewed by

Mistrust, complex domestic politics, and a lack of urgency by Israeli and Palestinian leaders continue to bedevil peace talks brokered by the Obama administration, says former U.S. negotiator Aaron David Miller.

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Ukraine Crisis Tests Uneasy U.S.-Germany Alliance

William Drozdiak interviewed by

Germany and the United States look to present a united front against Russia for its actions in Ukraine, despite recent strains in the long-standing relationship, says expert William M. Drozdiak.

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Historic Iraq Election Brings New Uncertainties

Ned Parker interviewed by

An array of internal challenges looms over Iraq's future as the country votes in its first general election since the 2011 U.S. withdrawal, explains expert Ned Parker.

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Is Ukraine on a Long Road to Rupture?

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Ukraine may be heading for the type of frozen conflict that occurred in Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova immediately after the breakup of the Soviet Union, says CFR's Stephen Sestanovich.

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Despite Ukraine, Iranian Nuclear Talks on Track

Barbara Slavin interviewed by

The crisis in Ukraine has not thus far diverted international diplomatic efforts toward a lasting deal on Tehran's controversial nuclear program, says expert Barbara Slavin.

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Can Moscow Step Back From Ukraine?

Steven Pifer interviewed by

The situation in Ukraine will continue to unravel unless Russia comes to planned diplomatic talks in Geneva this week with options for defusing the crisis, says expert Steven Pifer.

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CFR Events

General Meeting ⁄ Washington

Cold War Reflections and Today's Realities

James M. Goldgeier, Whitney Shepardson Senior Fellow for Transatlantic Relations, Council on Foreign Relations; Coauthor, "America Between the Wars: From 11/9 to 9/11"Robert M. Kimmitt, Senior International Counsel, WilmerHale; Former Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs (1989-91), and Former U.S. Ambassador to Germany (1991-93)

Bernard Gwertzman, Consulting Editor, CFR.org; Former Foreign Editor, "The New York Times" (1989-96)

12:00-12:30 p.m. - Lunch Reception
12:30-1:30 p.m. - Meeting

This meeting is not for attribution.

Bio

Bernard Gwertzman has spent his entire career in journalism, starting as a reporter for the Washington Star in Washington, DC, in 1960. There he covered the Cold War as a specialist on Communist affairs. In late 1968, he was hired by the New York Times and sent to Moscow as its bureau chief from 1969-71, where he covered the tensions along the Soviet-Chinese border and the first steps toward detente.

In 1971, Gwertzman returned to Washington, where he worked for the next sixteen years covering U.S. foreign policy for the Times. He traveled throughout the Middle East with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, where he charted the first Arab-Israeli accords, leading up to the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel brokered by President Carter in 1979. In that period, he also wrote extensively on the first arms control accords between the United States and Russia.

With the advent of President Reagan to the White House in 1981, he covered the chill in Soviet-American relations, followed by the warming of the Gorbachev-Reagan ties. In 1987, Gwertzman was invited to New York to become the deputy foreign editor of the Times, and in 1989, he became foreign editor. During his tenure as foreign editor, he directed the Times' coverage of the collapse of the Soviet empire, the Persian Gulf war, the U.S. invasion of Panama, the first Israeli agreement with the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), and the outbreak of the Bosnian war. In the six years Mr. Gwertzman was at the helm, the New York Times won four Pulitzer Prizes for international coverage.

When the Times began its electronic division in the summer of 1995, Mr. Gwertzman shifted to new media. He was editor-in-chief of the New York Times on the web from 1996 until he retired from the Times in 2002. He has been consulting editor for cfr.org since October 2002. Gwertzman, who has an AB and MA from Harvard, is the co-author with Haynes Johnson of Fulbright: the Dissenter, and with Michael Kaufman on three anthologies on the fall of Communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union. He lives in Riverdale, NY, with his wife Marie-Jeanne. He has two married sons, James and Michael.

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