‘The Challenges and Consequences of Being a Western Journalist in Russia’

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SPEAKERS: 

David Satter, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and a Former Moscow Correspondent

Luke Harding, Journalist, Author and Former Moscow Correspondent for The Guardian

Harding         Satter

TIME: 6 – 7pm, Tuesday 25th February 2014

VENUE: Thatcher Room, Portcullis House, House of Commons, London SW1A 2LW

To attend please RSVP to:

 

On 14 January 2014, David Satter – a distinguished US journalist – was expelled from Russia, becoming the first US journalist to be banned from the country since the end of the Cold War. Satter’s expulsion is part of a wider campaign by the Russian state to harass foreign journalists. Two years earlier, in February 2011, Luke Harding – The Guardian’s Moscow correspondent – was refused re-entry into Russia, becoming the first Western journalist to be banned from Russia since 1991.

The treatment meted out to Satter and Harding is evidence of the poor state of free speech in Russia. It has been interpreted by some commentators as an attempt by Russian authorities to force foreign correspondents in the country to engage in self-censorship. Certainly, Russian journalists are put under pressure to do just this. For those that do not, the consequences can be fatal. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, a US-based organisation, nineteen journalists have been killed in Russia over the last decade, nine of whom were killed by state-officials.

By kind invitation of Fabian Hamilton MP, The Russia Studies Centre at The Henry Jackson Society is pleased to invite you to a discussion with David Satter, Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and a Former Moscow Correspondent and Luke Harding, Journalist, Author and Former Moscow Correspondent for The Guardian. With President Putin’s well-publicised crackdown on personal freedoms over recent years, Satter and Harding will be speaking to questions such as: What is the situation with regards to press freedoms in Russia? What are the on-going threats to freedoms of expression? And, what does their treatment reveal about contemporary Russia?

 

Biographies

David Satter is a Senior Fellow at the Hudson Institute and a Fellow of the Foreign Policy Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He also teaches Russian politics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced Academic Programs.

A Moscow correspondent of the Financial Times from 1976-82, Mr Satter’s most recent publication is It Was a Long Time Ago and It Never Happened Anyway: Russia and the Communist Past, released in December 2012 by Yale University Press. Mr Satter is also author of Age of Delirium: the Decline and Fall of the Soviet Union and Darkness at Dawn: the Rise of the Russian Criminal State. His first publication, Age of Delirium, was been made into a documentary film which premiered in Washington on December 2011 and in Moscow on February 2012.

Mr Satter is a frequent contributor to publications including the Wall Street Journal and National Review Online, and has been interviewed by media outlets including Radio Liberty, Voice of America, and the BBC.

He was barred from returning to Russia in December 2013, becoming the first American journalist to be barred from Russia since the end of the Cold War.

Luke Harding is a journalist, author and was formerly The Guardian’s Moscow correspondent. Mr Harding moved to Russia from Berlin where he was The Guardian‘s Berlin correspondent for four years.

In 2007, Harding arrived in Moscow to take up a new job as a correspondent for The Guardian. Not long after, mysterious agents from Russia’s Federal Security Service, the successor to the KGB, broke into his flat. He was followed, bugged, and even summoned to Lefortovo, the FSB’s notorious prison. The break-in was the beginning of a psychological war against the journalist and his family that burst into the open in 2011 when he was expelled from Moscow for reporting allegations that under Vladimir Putin the country had become a “virtual mafia state”. The first western reporter to be deported from Russia since the days of the Cold War, Harding has written about his run-in with the new Russia in his book, Mafia State.

His new book on Edward Snowden – The Snowden Files – was published this month by Vintage in the US and Guardian Faber in the UK.

News Source : ‘The Challenges and Consequences of Being a Western Journalist in Russia’

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