Historic Iraq Election Brings New Uncertainties

CFR's picture
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionPDF versionPDF version

An array of internal challenges looms over Iraq's future as the country votes in its first general election since the 2011 U.S. withdrawal, explains expert Ned Parker.

See more in ; ;

Is Ukraine on a Long Road to Rupture?

interviewed by

Ukraine may be heading for the type of frozen conflict that occurred in Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Moldova immediately after the breakup of the Soviet Union, says CFR's Stephen Sestanovich.

See more in ; ;

Despite Ukraine, Iranian Nuclear Talks on Track

Barbara Slavin interviewed by

The crisis in Ukraine has not thus far diverted international diplomatic efforts toward a lasting deal on Tehran's controversial nuclear program, says expert Barbara Slavin.

See more in ;

Can Moscow Step Back From Ukraine?

Steven Pifer interviewed by

The situation in Ukraine will continue to unravel unless Russia comes to planned diplomatic talks in Geneva this week with options for defusing the crisis, says expert Steven Pifer.

See more in ; ;

Fraud Fears Loom Over Afghan Transition

interviewed by

Widespread election fraud could undermine Afghanistan's first democratic transfer of power and throw the country into chaos, says CFR's Stephen Biddle.

See more in ;

Split Persists Between Washington and Riyadh

F. Gregory Gause III interviewed by

Despite last week's fence-mending meeting between President Obama and King Abdullah, serious differences over policy regarding Iran, Syria, and Egypt remain between the United States and Saudi Arabia, says expert F. Gregory Gause.

See more in ;

Is the West at a Breaking Point With Russia?

John Beyrle interviewed by

The crisis in Crimea may represent something more than just another low point in Moscow's relations with the United States and its allies, says Russia expert John R. Beyrle.

See more in ; ;

Strobe Talbott interviewed by

With the annexation of Crimea and rhetoric about protecting Russians in the near abroad, President Vladimir Putin has helped launch a new stage of relations that poses threats to Russia's neighbors and itself, says expert Strobe Talbott.

See more in ; ;

interviewed by

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has weathered public protests, a corruption scandal, and mounting political pressure in the past year, and is likely to tighten his grip on power, says CFR's Steven Cook.

See more in ;

Putin’s Risky Improvisation in Ukraine

interviewed by

Russia's president is now seen by many in the West as an international outlaw for his actions in Crimea, and his intervention could still expand, says CFR's Stephen Sestanovich.

See more in ;

Ukraine's Crisis and the Middle East

Dennis Ross interviewed by

A decisive U.S. response to Russian provocation in Ukraine could create new opportunities for the United States to make headway on a number of fronts in the Middle East, says expert Dennis Ross.

See more in Middle East and North Africa;

How to Respond to Ukraine’s Crisis?

interviewed by

Negotiating a Russian withdrawal from Crimea is still possible, but U.S. and Western leaders have options to strengthen Ukraine if the situation worsens, says CFR President Richard N. Haass.

See more in ;

Ukraine’s New Era of Uncertainty

Serge Schmemann interviewed by

At a crucial moment for Ukraine and its economic viability, the EU and United States should join efforts with Russia to try to stabilize the country, says veteran journalist Serge Schmemann.

See more in ;

Making the Case Against North Korea

interviewed by

While North Korea has been condemned by a UN panel for crimes against humanity, its ally China is focused on denuclearization, not human rights, says CFR's Scott Snyder.

See more in ; ;

interviewed by

President Hollande's state visit was an attempted boost for the United States' lead EU security partner and a sign of a more activist foreign policy in the White House, says CFR's Charles Kupchan.

See more in ;

Can Syrian Talks Inch Forward?

Mona Yacoubian interviewed by

The lack of progress in Syrian peace talks doesn't mean diplomacy can't work, but the process needs to include regional powers, says expert Mona Yacoubian.

See more in ; Peace, Conflict, and Human Rights

Michele Dunne interviewed by

The United States doesn't welcome a military takeover in Egypt, but its options are hamstrung by the need for Egypt to be a regional security partner as well as a peace partner for Israel, says Michele Dunne.

See more in ;

Small Steps to Syrian Transition?

Edward P. Djerejian interviewed by

Though it's unlikely the Geneva II talks on Syria will yield major breakthroughs, movement is possible on humanitarian aid, cease-fires, and prisoner exchanges, says former ambassador to Syria Edward P. Djerejian.

See more in ;

Looking Toward Geneva II on Syria

Frederic Hof interviewed by

If the Geneva II conference on Syria takes place as scheduled next week, its best outcome would be a green light from Assad's regime for greater humanitarian relief, says expert Frederic C. Hof.

See more in ;

Jane Arraf interviewed by

With its Shiite government struggling for survival and poised for a confrontation with Sunni extremists in Fallujah, Iraq faces a deepening sectarian conflict partly fueled by spillover from Syria, says Jane Arraf.

See more in ;

Bio

Bernard Gwertzman has spent his entire career in journalism, starting as a reporter for the Washington Star in Washington, DC, in 1960. There he covered the Cold War as a specialist on Communist affairs. In late 1968, he was hired by the New York Times and sent to Moscow as its bureau chief from 1969-71, where he covered the tensions along the Soviet-Chinese border and the first steps toward detente.

In 1971, Gwertzman returned to Washington, where he worked for the next sixteen years covering U.S. foreign policy for the Times. He traveled throughout the Middle East with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, where he charted the first Arab-Israeli accords, leading up to the peace treaty between Egypt and Israel brokered by President Carter in 1979. In that period, he also wrote extensively on the first arms control accords between the United States and Russia.

With the advent of President Reagan to the White House in 1981, he covered the chill in Soviet-American relations, followed by the warming of the Gorbachev-Reagan ties. In 1987, Gwertzman was invited to New York to become the deputy foreign editor of the Times, and in 1989, he became foreign editor. During his tenure as foreign editor, he directed the Times' coverage of the collapse of the Soviet empire, the Persian Gulf war, the U.S. invasion of Panama, the first Israeli agreement with the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), and the outbreak of the Bosnian war. In the six years Mr. Gwertzman was at the helm, the New York Times won four Pulitzer Prizes for international coverage.

When the Times began its electronic division in the summer of 1995, Mr. Gwertzman shifted to new media. He was editor-in-chief of the New York Times on the web from 1996 until he retired from the Times in 2002. He has been consulting editor for cfr.org since October 2002. Gwertzman, who has an AB and MA from Harvard, is the co-author with Haynes Johnson of Fulbright: the Dissenter, and with Michael Kaufman on three anthologies on the fall of Communism and the breakup of the Soviet Union. He lives in Riverdale, NY, with his wife Marie-Jeanne. He has two married sons, James and Michael.

News Source : Historic Iraq Election Brings New Uncertainties
Copy this html code to your website/blog to embed this press release.