Living History Weekend at Andersonville National Historic Site

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Date: February 14, 2014
Contact: , 229 924-0343, ext. 201
Contact: , 229 924-0343, ext. 203

Explore the prisoner experience at Andersonville during the 150th Anniversary

ANDERSONVILLE, Georgia – Andersonville National Historic Site will host its annual Civil War Living History Weekend on Saturday, March 8and Sunday, March 9, 2014.This living history program offers visitors the opportunity to gain a better understanding of what life was like at Camp Sumter, the infamous Civil War military prison near Andersonville.Civil War period living historians will portray Union prisoners, Confederate guards, and civilians.

"Living history is a tool which allows visitors to gain direct insight into the experiences of the young men held here 150 years ago through interactions with volunteers portraying these individuals." remarked Brad Bennett, Superintendent. "We are thankful for the great support of the Friends of Andersonville and volunteers who create this opportunity to reflect on the significant sacrifices made by Americans toward liberty and justice for all citizens."

A variety of programs will be offered on both days, including guard drill and artillery demonstrations.Living historians will be present in the area of the prison site from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturday, and from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Sunday.There is no admission fee and this event is open to the public.

During the weekend the park will debut its newly redesigned Junior Ranger activity book: Captured! A Prisoner of War Story. This "choose your own adventure" style booklet allows children and families to explore the Civil War prison experience. A Junior Ranger Station will be open for kids to participate in a number of special activities.

Barry L. Brown, co-author of Crossroads of Conflict, a guide to Civil War sites in Georgia, will be present to sign copies of his book. Based on a comprehensive survey of sites identified by the Georgia Civil War Commission, Crossroads of Conflict covers 350 historic sites across the state of Georgia in detail, bringing the experience of the war to life.

The Living History Weekend is one of a variety of programs over the two-year period of the 150th anniversary of the prison in 2014 & 2015 that will explore the prison site and the prison experience at Andersonville while also addressing the larger story at other military prisons, in the north and south. Every two months during the anniversary period, the park will focus on a single word theme that represents the events, conditions, or emotions of prisoners during the war. To expand the prisoner story, the park will also feature other Civil War prisons and draw on their stories to present a fuller picture of the captivity experience. A second Living History Weekend will be held later in the year over the weekend of October 25-26, 2014.

For more information on anniversary programs, themes and other featured prisons, please visit the park website at: http://go.nps.gov/cwprisons

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles south of Oglethorpe, GA and 10 miles northeast of Americus, GA on Georgia Highway 49. The national park features the National Prisoner of War Museum, Andersonville National Cemetery and the site of the historic Civil War prison, Camp Sumter. ­Andersonville National Historic Site is the only national park within the National Park System to serve as a memorial to all American prisoners of war. Park grounds are open from 8:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. The National Prisoner of War Museum is open 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., daily. Admission is free. For more information on the park, call 229 924-0343, or visit at www.nps.gov/ande/ Visitus on Facebook at , Twitter

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About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America's 401 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov Visit us on Facebook , Twitter , and YouTube www.youtube.com/nationalparkservice.

Did You Know?

Grave 3585

About 150 African-American soldiers were believed to have been held at Andersonville. Of those 150, over 30 are known to have died at Andersonville. A number of the African-American prisoners were from the famed 54th Massachusetts Infantry. More...

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