Marine life on the move as oceans warm Australian waters polluted by harmful tiny plastics Ocean heatwave decimates vital WA seaweed habitat UWA researchers contribute to climate science debate New global study: seagrasses can store as much carbon as fore

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An internationally recognised expert in ocean currents who has been at The University of Western Australia for more than 25 years has become one of the scientists called upon by the world's media covering the global search for the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370 which disappeared with 239 passengers and crew 13 days ago.

Winthrop Professor Charitha Pattiaratchi has given 23 interviews to media outlets world-wide in the last 24 hours.

He is one of many scientists commenting on what may be the most difficult recovery effort in aviation history. It is hoped that debris in the Indian Ocean 2500km south-west of Perth may be part of the missing Beijing-bound Boeing 777.

Using computer models, Professor Pattiaratchi believes the debris may have floated from 500km to the west of the suspected crash site in some of the world's most treacherous seas.

Professor Pattiaratchi is Winthrop Professor of Coastal Oceanography. His research expertise is in coastal physical oceanography and coastal sediment transport, with emphasis on field experiments and numerical modelling.

He has played an active role in examining climate change effects in coastal regions of Western Australia and particularly in terms of ocean currents, wind and wave climate, sea level variability, coastal flooding and beach stability.

News Source : Marine life on the move as oceans warm Australian waters polluted by harmful tiny plastics Ocean heatwave decimates vital WA seaweed habitat UWA researchers contribute to climate science debate New global study: seagrasses can store as much carbon as forests

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