Order of nuns win stay on abortifacient insurance cover

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The Little Sisters of the Poor have been granted an injunction by the U.S Supreme court, temporarily freeing them from the obligation to obey the Obama Administration's 'HHS Mandate' requiring employers to include contraceptives and abortifacients in their employees' health insurance policies.

The Court re-affirmed an earlier temporary injunction granted by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, which will remain in effect until the merits of their case is decided by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals.

According to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is co-sponsoring the Sisters' lawsuit, the Court's order also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organisations that receive health benefits through the same Catholic benefits provider, the Christian Brothers.

While the mandate does have a waiver for certain religious organisations, The Little Sisters and the Christian Brothers had objected to being required to justify to the government that they should be entitled to an exemption. They said that filling out the paperwork for a waiver would involve instructing a third party to provide the coverage for contraception and abortifacient drugs, and that this would amount to them being part of the mechanism for providing abortion and other morally objectionable types of coverage.

Mark Rienzi, Senior Counsel for the Becket Fund, said “We are delighted that the Supreme Court has issued this order protecting the Little Sisters. The government has lots of ways to deliver contraceptives to people–it doesn’t need to force nuns to participate.”

The Supreme Court made it clear that the injunction “should not be construed as an expression of the court’s views on the merits” of the Little Sisters' case.

Meanwhile, the Ethics and Public Policy centre has filed an amicus brief in another mandate related case, that of arts and crafts store Hobby Lobby and other corporations with a religious ethos against the department of Health and Human Services. The EPPC's brief argues that if the Administration's argument is successful, it will allow the government to “make any market for goods or services a Free-Exercise-Free Zone simply by the artifice of placing whatever obligations it wants on corporate entities rather than on natural persons. In the Government’s view of the matter, an incorporated kosher deli could be forced to carry non-kosher goods; an independent Catholic hospital with a lay board could be required to provide abortions; a closely-held market owned by Seventh-day Adventists could be required to open on Saturdays; and an incorporated retail store owned by Muslims could be forced to carry liquor.”

The Little Sisters of the Poor have been granted an injunction by the U.S Supreme court, temporarily freeing them from the obligation to obey the Obama's 'HHS Mandate' requiring employers to include contraceptives and abortifacients in their employees' health insurance policies.

 

The Court re-affirmed an earlier temporary injunction granted by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, which will remain in effect until the merits of their case is decided by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals.

 

According to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is co-sponsoring the Sisters' lawsuit, the Court's order also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organisations that receive health benefits through the same Catholic benefits provider, the Christian Brothers.

 

While the mandate does have a waiver for certain religious organisations, The Little Sisters and the Christian Brothers had objected to being required to justify to the government that they should be entitled to an exemption. They said that filling out the paperwork for a waiver would involve instructing a third party to provide the coverage for contraception and abortifacient drugs, and that this would amount to them being part of the mechanism for providing abortion and other morally objectionable types of coverage.

Mark Rienzi, Senior Counsel for the Becket Fund, said “We are delighted that the Supreme Court has issued this order protecting the Little Sisters. The government has lots of ways to deliver contraceptives to people–it doesn’t need to force nuns to participate.”

The Supreme Court made it clear that it “should not be construed as an expression of the court’s views on the merits” of the Little Sisters' case.

 

Meanwhile, the Ethics and Public Policy centre has filed an amicus brief in another mandate related case, that of arts and crafts store Hobby Lobby and other corporations with a religious ethos against the department of Health and Human Services. The EPPC's brief argues that if the Administration's argument is successful, it will allow the government to “make any market for goods or services a Free-Exercise-Free Zone simply by the artifice of placing whatever obligations it wants on corporate entities rather than on natural persons. In the Government’s view of the matter, an incorporated kosher deli could be forced to carry non-kosher goods; an independent Catholic hospital with a lay board could be required to provide abortions; a closely-held market owned by Seventh-day Adventists could be required to open on Saturdays; and an incorporated retail store owned by Muslims could be forced to carry liquor.”

The Little Sisters of the Poor have been granted an injunction by the U.S Supreme court, temporarily freeing them from the obligation to obey the Obama's 'HHS Mandate' requiring employers to include contraceptives and abortifacients in their employees' health insurance policies.

The Court re-affirmed an earlier temporary injunction granted by Justice Sonia Sotomayor, which will remain in effect until the merits of their case is decided by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals.

According to the Becket Fund for Religious Liberty, which is co-sponsoring the Sisters' lawsuit, the Court's order also provides protection to more than 400 other Catholic organisations that receive health benefits through the same Catholic benefits provider, the Christian Brothers.

While the mandate does have a waiver for certain religious organisations, The Little Sisters and the Christian Brothers had objected to being required to justify to the government that they should be entitled to an exemption. They said that filling out the paperwork for a waiver would involve instructing a third party to provide the coverage for contraception and abortifacient drugs, and that this would amount to them being part of the mechanism for providing abortion and other morally objectionable types of coverage.

Mark Rienzi, Senior Counsel for the Becket Fund, said “We are delighted that the Supreme Court has issued this order protecting the Little Sisters. The government has lots of ways to deliver contraceptives to people–it doesn’t need to force nuns to participate.”

The Supreme Court made it clear that it “should not be construed as an expression of the court’s views on the merits” of the Little Sisters' case.

Meanwhile, the Ethics and Public Policy centre has filed an amicus brief in another mandate related case, that of arts and crafts store Hobby Lobby and other corporations with a religious ethos against the department of Health and Human Services. The EPPC's brief argues that if the Administration's argument is successful, it will allow the government to “make any market for goods or services a Free-Exercise-Free Zone simply by the artifice of placing whatever obligations it wants on corporate entities rather than on natural persons. In the Government’s view of the matter, an incorporated kosher deli could be forced to carry non-kosher goods; an independent Catholic hospital with a lay board could be required to provide abortions; a closely-held market owned by Seventh-day Adventists could be required to open on Saturdays; and an incorporated retail store owned by Muslims could be forced to carry liquor.”

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