San Francisco Maritime Labor History Comes Alive With Living History Reenactments At Hyde Street Pier 2014

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Living History players dressed in 1901-era clothing waking on the pier carrying signs.

Living History players on Hyde Street Pier reenacting the 1901 San Francisco waterfront strike

Date: March 10, 2014
Contact: , 415-561-7006

On Saturday, July 12, 2014, on Hyde Street Pier from 12-4pm, San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park presents an afternoon of costumed living history depicting events during the 1901 San Francisco waterfront strike. 

From July 13 to October 2, 1901, San Francisco’s waterfront was shut down by sailors, teamsters, and longshoremen striking for better pay and working conditions. Experience the sights and sounds of San Francisco history through a Living History reenactment. Hear impassioned speeches and voice your own opinion! Take part in a march as strikers implore ships’ crews to join their ranks. Watch as a ship owner and ship’s officer defy the strikers.

The strike reenactment will take place on Hyde Street Pier at 12pm, and repeated at 3pm. Admission to historic ships: adults, $5, ages 15 and under, free. Free with National Park passes. There is no admission charge to walk on Hyde Street Pier. Fees are for boarding historic ships. For more information, please call the park’s Visitor Center: 415-447-5000, or see www.nps.gov/safr/.

San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park is located at the west end of Fisherman’s Wharf, in San Francisco. The park includes a magnificent fleet of historic ships, Maritime Museum, Visitor Center, Aquatic Park Historic District, and library. For more information about the park, or its public programs, please call 415-447-5000, or visit the park’s website at http://www.nps.gov/safr/.

Did You Know?

A white marking painted on the port side of Balclutha with letters and lines.

This "Plimsoll Mark" is painted on the port side of Balclutha and named for Samuel Plimsoll, an Englishman who fought to pass the Merchant Shipping Act of 1876. Before this law, many ships were dangerously overloaded and many sank. These “coffin ships” claimed the lives of many sailors. More...

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