Tropical Storm and Storm Surge Warnings Remain in Effect as Maria Lingers

Governor Pat McCrory's picture
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Hurricane Maria’s waves continue to batter the North Carolina coastline, but coastal counties are not reporting any unexpected issues as a result of the slow moving storm.

 

“Maria is moving slowly, and our coast is not out of harm’s way yet,” said Governor Roy Cooper. “People on the Outer Banks need to remain aware and cautious, as travel is hazardous in some areas. ”

 

Wednesday afternoon a Tropical Storm Warning remained in effect for north of Cape Hatteras to Duck and a Storm Surge Warning remained in effect from Ocracoke Inlet to the North Carolina/ Virginia border and for the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. Maria is moving slowly to the north-northeast and is forecast to accelerate in a more easterly direction on Thursday, moving away from North Carolina.  Heavy surf and dangerous rip currents will continue through the week and people should stay out of the water.

 

Ocean overwash and soundside flooding have covered portions of NC 12 in some areas and driving is not advisable in areas where water covers the road. Ferry service remains suspended to Ocracoke Island and on the Currituck/Knotts Island route. Ferry crews will begin test runs Thursday morning to see if conditions are suitable for resuming ferry service.

 

Evacuations of visitors from Ocracoke Island and Hatteras Island remain in effect. Vacationers should watch for guidance from county governments about re-entry procedures when those evacuations are lifted.

 

No significant power outages were reported in coastal counties as of 4 p.m.

 

Download the Ready NC app, visit ReadyNC.org or follow @NCEmergency on and to stay informed and prepared.

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