Weight loss study finds rich more likely to join clubs, while poor more likely to take pills

SheffieldUniv's picture
Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly versionPDF versionPDF version

• Obesity in poor areas twice as likely as in wealthier areas

• Men more overweight than women, but less concerned about it

• Poor people more likely to have used weight loss medication whereas slimming clubs more popular in affluent areas

Where you live and deprivation levels can affect your efforts to lose weight according to a new study from the University of Sheffield, which found that people from wealthy areas are more likely to have used slimming clubs than people from more deprived areas.

The unique study also found that those from more deprived areas are more likely to have used weight-loss medications than their richer neighbours.

More than half of the 26,000 people who took part in the study were overweight, with 19.6 per cent found to be obese. Obesity was most common among older people affecting 22.8 per cent of those between the ages of 56 to 75 and 16.9 per cent of people aged 76 or over. People living in more deprived areas were more than twice as likely to be obese than those living in richer areas.

Person weighing themselves on scalesWhen asked which methods they had used to manage their weight, the most common strategies included healthy eating (49 per cent), increasing exercise (43.4 per cent) and reducing portion size (43 per cent). Those living in the most deprived areas were least likely to report managing their weight through these methods but were the most likely to report using weight loss medication and/or meal replacements. While only 1.9 per cent of people in wealthy areas had tried weight loss medication, more than twice as many people from deprived areas had taken pills (alli, orlistat, herbal remedies, appetite suppressants) to control their weight. People in the most deprived areas were also the least likely to have attended a slimming club.

The study also found that women were much more likely to be concerned about their weight than men, despite the fact that more men were overweight than women. 44 per cent of men were found to be overweight, compared to 31 per cent of women. However, 45 per cent of women reported feeling concerned about their weight compared to just 31 per cent of men.

Dr Clare Relton who led the study at the University of Sheffield said: "This study shows that both obesity and the approaches people use to manage their weight vary according to whether you live in a deprived area or a wealthy area."

Professor Paul Bissell, who was involved in the study added: "We’ve known for some time about the social gradient in obesity, but this study also provides evidence that services are differentially taken up by patients according to levels of deprivation."

Additional information

The University of Sheffield

With almost 25,000 of the brightest students from around 120 countries, learning alongside over 1,200 of the best academics from across the globe, the University of Sheffield is one of the world’s leading universities.

A member of the UK’s prestigious Russell Group of leading research-led institutions, Sheffield offers world-class teaching and research excellence across a wide range of disciplines.

Unified by the power of discovery and understanding, staff and students at the university are committed to finding new ways to transform the world we live in.

In 2014 it was voted number one university in the UK for Student Satisfaction by Times Higher Education and in the last decade has won four Queen’s Anniversary Prizes in recognition of the outstanding contribution to the United Kingdom’s intellectual, economic, cultural and social life.

Sheffield has five Nobel Prize winners among former staff and students and its alumni go on to hold positions of great responsibility and influence all over the world, making significant contributions in their chosen fields.

Global research partners and clients include Boeing, Rolls-Royce, Unilever, AstraZeneca, Glaxo SmithKline and Siemens, as well as many UK and overseas government agencies and charitable foundations.

News Source : Weight loss study finds rich more likely to join clubs, while poor more likely to take pills
Copy this html code to your website/blog to embed this press release.